Posts Tagged ‘Tulane Business Forum’

Key to success: Stay true to mission

Friday, September 19th, 2014

At first glance, the keynote speakers at the 35th annual Tulane Business Forum couldn’t have been more different. Laurie Ann Goldman helped build spunky shapewear manufacturer Spanx into an international brand with $250 million in annual sales, while David Dunlap heads Superior Energy Services, a $4.6 billion company that specializes in hydraulic fracturing and oilfield services.

Goldman-TBF_055

Laurie Ann Goldman, former CEO of Spanx, talked about some of the entrepreneurial lessons the company taught her as a keynote speaker at the 2014 Tulane Business Forum.

But despite their differences, the two executives had a similar message for forum attendees on Thursday (Sept. 18): Stay true to your company’s unique mission, and success will take care of itself.

Goldman, a third-generation Tulane alumna, said one of the keys to Spanx’s success was identifying the company’s true mission: to help customers improve their self-esteem.

“We defined the look better-feel better connection with an accessible, best-friend mentality,” Goldman told the audience, adding that the company helped women laugh about fashion challenges like the dreaded muffin-top.

“Laughing about imperfections is really just a part of sharing and helping women get comfortable with whatever they consider their problem areas to be,” Goldman said. “That spirit of fun and irreverence is really what separated Spanx.”

Dunlap said the companies driving the current domestic oil production boom are looking for something that the big players like Halliburton can’t provide

“The new customers want reliability, they want innovation and they want cost efficiency,” Dunlap said, advantages traditionally associated with small companies.

Dunlap-2-330-TBF_093

David E. Dunlap, president and CEO of Superior Energy Services, said the developers driving the current domestic oil boom are looking for oilfield services firms with a small-company mentality.

Despite Superior’s large size, Dunlap said the company’s unique philosophy — buying regional, often family-owned companies and keeping those companies’ managers in place – has made it a good match for today’s market environment.

“[Our employees] have what we call a founder’s mentality,” Dunlap said. “They think about doing things faster and better and cheaper and easier. That’s the kind of mentality of management we’re looking for because that’s the kind of mentality of management that thinks like a small company.”

The forum, which took place at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside, kicked off with welcoming remarks by Dean Ira Solomon and also featured presentations by Laura Cox Kaplan, principal-in-charge of Government, Regulatory Affairs and Public Policy at PricewaterhouseCoopers; Iftikhar Ahmad, executive director of the New Orleans Aviation Board; Gregory C. Feirn, CEO of LCMC Health; and Wan Kim, CEO of Smoothie King.

The Tulane Business Forum is an annual presentation of the A. B. Freeman School of Business and the Tulane Association of Business Alumni (TABA), which uses funds from the forum to support a wide array of student-focused programs.

 


Tulane Business Forum reaches the height of success

Friday, September 5th, 2014

For its 35th annual program, the Tulane Business Forum highlights the achievements of renowned local, national and international organizations and the visionaries behind the scenes. These savvy business leaders will share the secrets of their successes in an enlightening and entertaining look at best business practices.

David Dunlap

David Dunlap

Laurie Ann Goldman

Laurie Ann Goldman

“Taking Flight: Business Leaders Executing Plans for Success” will feature keynote speakers David D. Dunlap, president and CEO of Superior Energy Services Inc. (Houston), and Laurie Ann Goldman, former CEO of SPANX (Atlanta). Dunlap will offer his perspective on how unconventional resource development has resulted in new opportunities in the oil and gas services market and how Superior Energy Services is effectively competing with industry giants. Goldman will draw on her past experience at shapewear powerhouse SPANX and illustrate how successful startups can become lucrative mainstays if complacency is not part of the business equation.

The Tulane Business Forum, presented by Iberiabank Corp. and sponsored by the Tulane Association of Business Alumni (TABA), will be held on Thursday, Sept. 18, from 8:15 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside.

Other presenters this year include:

  • Ira Solomon, dean of the A. B. Freeman School of Business at Tulane University (New Orleans), will provide welcoming remarks.
  • Iftikhar Ahmad, executive director of the New Orleans Aviation Board (New Orleans), will describe the many reforms put in place at Louis Armstrong International Airport since May 2010 and outline his vision to achieve a world class airport.
  • Laura Cox Kaplan, principal-in-charge of government, regulatory affairs & public policy of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP (Washington D.C.), will provide insight on the tactics and strategies that work in Washington for business and will share a few case studies to demonstrate these points.
  • Gregory C. Feirn, CEO of LCMC Health (New Orleans), will report on the expeditious growth of LCMC, a locally based non-profit healthcare system founded in 2009, and its role as a primary provider of health care in the Gulf Coast region.
  • Wan Kim, CEO of Smoothie King (Metairie), will talk about the advantages that led to his decision to move his company headquarters to Metairie and the vision for the brand’s future and global expansion.

The Tulane Association of Business Alumni (TABA) represents over 19,000 alumni worldwide, and the forum is its premier event. Each year, the forum features speakers of national and international acclaim who address a variety of business topics of interest to the business community.

Forum registration, which includes continental breakfast and lunch, is $160 for the general public and $130 for Tulane alumni. Accountants can earn five Continuing Professional Education credits and engineers can earn five Professional Development Hour credits by attending the forum. For more information or to register, visit TulaneBusinessForum.com or call 504-861-7921.


Tulane Business Forum looks at leveraging Louisiana

Monday, June 3rd, 2013

The CEOs of two of Louisiana’s biggest home-grown success stories — Daryl G. Byrd of Iberiabank Corp. and  José S. Suquet of Pan-American Life Insurance Group — will discuss what it took to build those businesses as keynote speakers at the 34th annual Tulane Business Forum, “Home Grown: Leveraging the Louisiana Business Experience on a National Scale.”

Daryl G. Byrd

José S. Suquet

This year’s forum, which will take place on Friday, Sept. 27, at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside, shines the spotlight on businesses that have leveraged the state’s unique resources to achieve national and international success.

Joining Byrd, who will deliver the morning keynote address, and Suquet, who will deliver the luncheon keynote, will be Gary P. LaGrange, president and CEO of the Port of New Orleans, and John F. Tercek, vice president for commercial and new business development at Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.

The forum will also feature a panel on tourism and economic development featuring Darryl Berger, chairman of the New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corp.; Tod R. Chambers, general manager of the Roosevelt New Orleans Hotel; Jay Dardenne, lieutenant governor of Louisiana; and Gregory Rusovich, chairman of the New Orleans Convention & Visitors Bureau. Scott Couvillon of Trumpet will moderate.

The 34th annual Tulane Business Forum is a presentation of the A. B. Freeman School of Business at Tulane University, the Tulane Association of Business Alumni (TABA) and Iberiabank.

For more information about this year’s program and to register online, visit tulanebusinessforum.com.

 

 


Sports takes the spotlight at Tulane Business Forum

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2012

From the NBA All-Star Game and the BCS College Football Championship to the NCAA Men’s Final Four and the Super Bowl, New Orleans has in the last four years reemerged as one of the nation’s leading destinations for major sporting events.

Tulane Business Forum

A panel of local sports officials said greater collaboration has helped New Orleans reemerge as one of the nation’s leading destinations for major sporting events. From left, Mark Romig, Jay Cicero, Rick Dickson, Dennis Lauscha and Doug Thornton.

At the 33rd annual Tulane Business Forum, which took place on Friday (Sept. 28) at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside, a panel of local sports officials said that impressive post-Katrina run isn’t an accident.

“I can think back five or six years ago to conversations that all of us here had in terms of what can our industry do to impact and contribute to the recovery of our state,” said panelist Rick Dickson, Tulane athletics director. “It’s been very gratifying to help to facilitate these events.”

Joining Dickson for the panel discussion of sports and economic development were Dennis Lauscha, president of the New Orleans Saints and New Orleans Hornets; Doug Thornton, senior vice president of SMG, the management company for the Mercedes-Benz Superdome and the New Orleans Arena; and Jay Cicero, president and CEO of the Greater New Orleans Sports Foundation. Mark Romig, president and CEO of New Orleans Tourism Marketing Corp., moderated the session.

Increased collaboration has been a big factor in attracting major sporting events to the city, but an even bigger factor may be the city itself. According to the panelists, no other city in the nation features world-class venues and abundant hotel rooms within walking distance of a hospitality center like the French Quarter.

That compact footprint enables the city to save millions in hosting expenses. While Super Bowls in Indianapolis and Dallas cost upwards of $35 million, New Orleans is hosting Super Bowl XLVII for about $13.5 million.

“The reason we can do that is because of our footprint and because of everyone working together,” said Lauscha. “It’s really amazing when you think we’re going to have one of the best Super Bowls, and we’re going to do it for about a third of the cost of Dallas.”

With the title “Scoring Big: Building on Business Victories,” this year’s forum had a sports theme. In addition to the panel discussion, Tulane President Scott Cowen delivered a sobering presentation on the state of intercollegiate athletics, an institution facing serious obstacles in the form of  increased commercialism, challenges to amateurism, questions of integrity, a lack of financial sustainability and concerns over player safety.

Carl J. Schramm

Carl J. Schramm, president of Schramm & Co. and former president of the Kauffman Foundation, discussed ways to make American capitalism more entrepreneurial as this year’s keynote luncheon speaker.

“The current system is not sustainable in its current form,” Cowen said. “I want to be proven wrong. I believe very strongly in the value of intercollegiate athletics in the higher education community. I would just like to make sure that it’s sustainable and that it represents the values that we always envisioned for intercollegiate athletics.”

Delivering the keynote addresses this year were Carl J. Chaney, president and CEO of Whitney Bank, who discussed Hancock Holding Co.’s acquisition of the venerable New Orleans bank in 2010, and Carl J. Schramm, president of Schramm  & Co. and former president of the Kauffman Foundation, whose luncheon keynote talk addressed ways to make American capitalism more entrepreneurial.

The program also included presentations by Beth A. Brooke, global vice chair of public policy with Ernst & Young, who discussed the potential impacts of the presidential election on business, and John C. Sheptor, former president and CEO of Imperial Sugar Co., who talked about how he repositioned Imperial for new products and markets.

The Tulane Business Forum is an annual presentation of the A. B. Freeman School of Business and the Tulane Association of Business Alumni (TABA).

 


Tulane Business Forum looks at leveraging resources

Monday, October 11th, 2010

The Receivables Exchange was founded to connect small- and mid-size businesses in need of working capital with investors, but according to president and co-founder Nicolas Perkin, the biggest innovation the New Orleans-based company brought to factoring wasn’t creating a transparent marketplace for buyers and sellers of commercial receivable. It was enabling buyers to apply the same risk-management principles to receivables that they apply to the rest of their portfolios.

Nic Perkin

Nicolas R. Perkin, co-founder and president of the Receivables Exchange, talked about the company's growth as part of a panel discussion on alternative capital markets.

“Buyers can take 1 percent of 100 different auctions across 100 different industries,” said Perkin (TC ’94). “If you’re going to go buy stock, you’re not going to put all your money in IBM. You don’t do it in any asset class, why would you do it in this asset class? That’s really the fundamental principle of the innovation we think we’ve brought to the table.”

That unique innovation has helped to fuel 300 to 400 percent annual growth at the company, which Perkin said is in the early stages of a preparing for an IPO.

Perkin talked about the evolution of the Receivables Exchange and the current business landscape as part of a panel discussion on alternative capital markets at this year’s Tulane Business Forum. The forum, an annual presentation of the Tulane Association of Business Alumni (TABA), took place at the Sheraton New Orleans Hotel on Oct. 8. This year’s program focused on the theme “Leveraging Corporate Resources,” and more than 650 people attended the forum to hear some of the ways that innovative businesses and business leaders are doing more with less.

Robbie Vitrano, co-founder and chairman of marketing firm Trumpet, told the story of Naked Pizza, which has used social media to grow from a single store in New Orleans to an international business with 400 stores in development in locations as far away as Dubai and Istanbul.

“We used [social media] as a way to get people interested in our idea, primarily using Twitter and Facebook to distribute this conversation in a way that allowed Naked Pizza to acquire two billionaire investors and more than 5,000 franchising inquiries,” Vitrano said. “It allowed for media to get a hold of this idea and start to distribute it. While we were just one location, were were in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times and blogs around the world. In essence, it allowed us to validate the concept.”

Vitrano added that the low cost and wide reach of social media platforms makes them an ideal tool for businesses to find out what ideas work in a cost-effective way.

“Conceivably, that should favor a place like New Orleans, which isn’t New York or Silicon Valley but which certainly has Net intelligence and Net ingenuity,” he said.

David Brain, president and CEO of Entertainment Properties Trust.

The forum kicked off with a presentation by Charles N. Kahn III, president and CEO of the Federation of AmericanHospitals, who walked attendees through the process of how health reform was enacted and what it will mean for business. Kahn was followed by Vitrano and John Winsor, CEO of Victors & Spoils, a marketing firm based in Boulder, Colo., that, like Trumpet, is using social media technology to accomplish things that previously would have been unthinkable for an agency with just 10 employees.

Joining Perkin on the alternative capital markets panel were J. Marshall Page III, a partner at Jones Walker, and Christopher J. Perry, president and global head of Thomson Reuters Trading Focus Accounts. The panel was moderated by Peter Ricchiuti, assistant dean at the Freeman School and research director of the Burkenroad Reports program.

David Brain (A&S ’78, MBA ’79), president and CEO of Entertainment Properties Trust, a NYSE-traded REIT that focuses on megaplex movie theatres and entertainment retail centers, followed the capital markets discussion with a presentation on the often misunderstood concept of off-balance-sheet financing.

Dean E. Taylor, chairman, president and CEO of Tidewater, talked about the ways the company distinguishes itself in a commodity industry as luncheon keynote speaker.

The forum concluded with a luncheon keynote presentation by Dean E. Taylor (A&S ’71), chairman, president and CEO of Tidewater Inc. Taylor’s presentation focused on distinguishing your company in a commodity industry, and one of the key elements to achieve that goal, he said, is having the right people in place. To illustrate his point, Taylor showed a video that told the inspiring story of Tidewater’s Damon B. Bankston supply boat, whose crew rescued 115 people from the waters of the Gulf of Mexico following the explosion and fire aboard the BP Horizon oil rig.

“That’s something about which I’m immensely proud,” Taylor said. “They didn’t do it for glory. They didn’t do it for any other reason than it was the right thing to do. That’s typical of so many people in our industry that do what they do because they feel like it’s the right thing to do.”


Business Forum looks at leveraging corporate resources

Tuesday, October 5th, 2010

Freeman School assistant dean Peter Ricchiuti has seen Black Monday, the dot-com boom and bust, the subprime mortgage crisis, and the worldwide financial meltdown, yet he’s never seen anything quite like what’s happening in today’s credit markets.

Peter Ricchiuti

Peter Ricchiuti, assistant dean at the Freeman School, will moderate a panel on alternative capital markets at this Friday's Tulane Business Forum.

“The country is awash with cash, but if you’re an individual or a small business, banks aren’t lending,” says Ricchiuti. “There’s plenty of money out there but not a lot of appetite for risk. Small businesses are really struggling and having to come up with innovative ways to come up with financing.”

This Friday, Ricchiuti will moderate a panel that explores some of the innovative ways small businesses are coming up with financing at the 31st annual Tulane Business Forum. The forum, an annual presentation of the Tulane Association of Business Alumni, takes place at the New Orleans Sheraton Hotel from 8 a.m. to 1:45 p.m.

Participating in the panel will be J. Marshall Page, an attorney at Jones Walker who specializes in private equity investments and leveraging state and federal tax incentives; Christopher Perry, who oversees the delivery of information, analytics and tools for capital markets trading organizations at Thomson Reuters; and Nicolas Perkin, founder of the New Orleans-based Receivables Exchange, which enables small and medium-sized businesses to sell their accounts receivables and access working capital in as little as three days.

The Receivables Exchange has established an online marketplace for businesses to auction off their receivables, making the financial transaction known as factoring—in which businesses sell their invoices at a discount to obtain working capital—much less costly and time consuming than conventional factoring deals.

“The Receivables Exchange is really one of the biggest stories in Louisiana,” Ricchiuti says. “The factoring market is something like 20 times the size of Wall Street in terms of numbers, and Nic wants to make the exchange here.”

In addition to the panel, other speakers taking on this year’s forum theme of “Leveraging Corporate Resources” will be Dean Taylor, chairman of Tidewater Inc., who will talk about ways in which Tidewater distinguishes itself in an increasingly commoditized business; Charles Kahn III, president and CEO of the Federation of American Hospitals, who will discuss the impact of health reform; David Brain, president and CEO of Entertainment Properties Trust, who will talk about off-balance sheet-financing; and Robbie Vitrano, chairman of Trumpet, and John Winsor, CEO of Victors & Spoils, who will talk about social media and strategies for the post-mass-media age.

For more information about this year’s program and to register online, visit TulaneBusinessForum.com.


Business Forum looks at corporate consciousness

Monday, October 12th, 2009

Whole Foods Market co-founder and CEO John Mackey drew the wrath of many longtime customers in August with a Wall Street Journal opinion piece that proposed free-market alternatives to healthcare reform, but the article was vintage Mackey, combining the iconoclastic executive’s strong beliefs in the power of capitalism and the importance of social responsibility in business.

Whole Foods Market CEO and co-founder John Mackey will deliver the luncheon keynote presentation at this year's Tulane Business Forum.

Whole Foods Market CEO and co-founder John Mackey will deliver the luncheon keynote presentation at this year's Tulane Business Forum.

On Friday, Oct. 16, Mackey will be in New Orleans to deliver the luncheon keynote presentation at the 2009 Tulane Business Forum, which this year focuses on the theme of corporate consciousness.

“The whole idea of corporate consciousness goes back to the basic business fundamentals of doing things in an ethical manner and being responsible and purposeful in how you gear your business,” says Tom Spiers (MBA ’01), board member of the Tulane Association of Business Alumni (TABA), which organizes the annual event. “We thought this would be a good way to focus on how to return to core values and how certain large organizations are doing it and succeeding at it.”

In addition to Mackey, other speakers addressing corporate consciousness, ethics and social responsibility include Mark Quartermain, president of Shell Energy North America; Alan R. Yuspeh, senior vice president and chief ethics and compliance officer of HCA; and Gary Jay Saulson, director of corporate real estate with PNC Financial Services Group.

The forum will also feature a panel discussion on alternative energy and financing featuring Jon Guidroz, director of project development with Free Flow Power Corp.; D’Juan Hernandez, president and CEO of Sun Energy Group; and Eldon Klaassen, CEO of Allegro. The discussion will be moderated by Michael L. LeBourgeois, principal of NGP Energy Technology Partners in New Orleans.

The 2009 Tulane Business Forum will take place at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside. Registration and continental breakfast will begin at 8 a.m. and the forum will begin at 8:30 a.m. For more information about this year’s program, visit tulanebusinessforum.com.


HCA chief highlights Tulane Business Forum

Monday, October 20th, 2008

The most innovative idea in the world isn’t worth a nickel if you don’t execute it properly.

That was the central message of Richard M. Bracken, president and COO of Hospital Corp. of America, the world’s largest private operator of health care facilities, in his keynote luncheon address at the 29th annual Tulane Business Forum.

The forum, an annual presentation of the Tulane Association of Business Alumni, took place on Friday, Oct. 17, at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside. More than 700 local business leaders attended this year’s event.

The theme of this year’s forum was innovation, and Bracken used the opportunity to discuss some of the innovative ideas that have guided the growth of HCA.

“You really don’t get the chance to do big, earth-shattering ideas in every environment, but a lot of really good things come from small changes,” Bracken said.

He cited a program HCA initiated to reduce hospital-acquired infections, a major problem in the health care industry. By creating a simple program that encouraged clinicians to wash their hands more frequently-and executing that program effectively by involving clinicians, administrators and even patients in the process-HCA was able to reduce infections inside its hospitals dramatically.

“Surgical-acquired infections went down by half,” Bracken said. “Bloodstream infections went down by about a third. We had stunning results. This is a fine example that small changes can lead to big gains.”

Bracken also discussed some of the innovation-related mistakes HCA has made over the years, including a 1995 effort to streamline its supply chain in the style of Wal-Mart. HCA made the mistake of implementing that change in operations from the top down, and the company ended up paying the price.

“It was a great idea, but it was poorly executed,” Bracken said. “It went nowhere in a hurry, not because the idea was wrong but because the execution was wrong.”

Bracken said that HCA went back to the drawing board and re-implemented the effort, this time from the bottom up, and the streamlining program became a success.

“Innovation is really a leadership problem,” Bracken added. “It’s not a problem with your employees. It’s about embracing it and structuring it and putting it where it’s going to have some chance for success.”

Bracken, a Tulane parent, got a laugh at the beginning of his presentation by praising Tulane University as a leader in innovation, not so much for its role in the recovery of New Orleans or the transformation of public education but for the transformation of his two sons.

Bracken showed the audience two sets of photos of Richard Bracken Jr. (L ’09) and Robert Bracken (A ’08). In the first set, Richard, with a guitar perched on his lap, looked up from beneath a mop of shaggy hair while Robert smiled blissfully while traveling in South America. In the second set of photos, both Richard and Robert were cleanly shaven and wearing coats and ties.

“Tulane worked some pretty serious innovation on these guys,” Bracken said. “It took me about two months to get this second set of pictures done, but my great thanks to the faculty of Tulane and their respective colleges for really working some magic on these fellas.”

In addition to Bracken, this year’s forum featured a wide range of speakers addressing the role of innovation, including retired Maj. Gen. David M. Mize of Apogen Technologies/QinetiQ, Debra Neill Baker and Edwin Neill III of Neil Corp., William F. Borne of Amedisys, Jim Bridger of New Orleans Public Belt Railroad, Todd M. Hornbeck of Hornbeck Offshore Services Inc., and Matthew M. Wisdom of TurboSquid Inc.


Tulane Business Forum preview

Friday, September 26th, 2008

Richard M. Bracken, president and COO of HCA, the world’s largest private operator of health care facilities, highlights a wide-ranging lineup of speakers scheduled to present at the 29th annual Tulane Business Forum.

This year’s forum, which will take place on Friday, Oct. 17, at the Hilton New Orleans Riverside, focuses on the theme of innovation, a topic that forum co-chair Keith Crawford says is relevant to all businesses regardless of size or industry.

“Innovation can be found in some unlikely places,” says Crawford, a management consultant and chief financial officer with local entrepreneurial support firm the Idea Village. “For example, you don’t think of the offshore services industry as being terribly innovative, but Todd Hornbeck has brought an incredible level of innovation not only to his boats but to the way the business is structured. The joke among the industry is that his vessels out in the Gulf look more like NASA space shuttles.”

Hornbeck, chairman, president and CEO of Covington-based Hornbeck Offshore Services, will participate in a panel discussion on spotting opportunities along with Jim Bridger, general manager of the New Orleans Public Belt Railroad, and Matthew M. Wisdom, co-founder and CEO of TurboSquid Inc. Business writer and editor Kathy Finn will moderate.

The forum kicks off with David M. Mize, retired major general and senior vice president with Apogen Technologies/QinetiQ North America, who will discuss the proposed Federal City project in Algiers, an innovative new model for military and federal installations. Next, Debra Neill Baker and Edwin Neill III of Hammond-based Neill Corp. will talk about the role innovation has played in building their business, one of the nation’s leading beauty and salon services companies.

William F. Borne, chairman and CEO of Baton Rouge’s Amedisys Inc., a leading provider of home health care and hospice services, will address his company’s approach to the value proposition in health care. Following the panel discussion, Bracken will deliver this year’s keynote luncheon address, “HCA and Innovation: Not Only a Requirement for Success, but an Important Aspect of Company Culture.”

“Innovation as a process is something the New Orleans business community needs,” says Crawford. “I think one reason more businesses aren’t demonstrating innovative thinking is that no one’s ever shown them how to drive innovation through their organizations. That’s really what we strived to do with our slate of speakers.”

Registration for this year’s forum is at 8 a.m., and the conference runs from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Tulane faculty and staff can register at the special discounted rate of $75. For more information about the special rate, please contact Rhonda Earles at 504-865-8470 or rearles@tulane.edu. To learn more about this year’s program, visit http://tbf.tulane.edu.



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