Posts Tagged ‘Peter Ricchiuti’

Bloomberg Markets: Burkenroad Fund Tops Peers

Thursday, November 13th, 2014

bloomberg-markets

From Bloomberg Markets magazine, November 2014:

The fund takes its name from the Burkenroad Reports written by students at Tulane’s Freeman School of Business. Peter Ricchiuti founded the program in 1993 and named it after William Burkenroad Jr., a Tulane alum and donor. Each year, about 200 undergraduate and graduate students in Ricchiuti’s course fan out in teams across the South and spend a day with executives at about 40 publicly traded firms. The companies are often hungry for the attention, Ricchiuti says. “The further you are from Wall Street, the more you’re likely to find companies that nobody knows about. They don’t tend to get overpriced and overhyped.”

To read the article in its entirety, visit Bloomberg.com:

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-11-13/burkenroad-fund-tops-peers-with-small-cap-stars-in-dixie.html


Five faculty members honored with awards

Tuesday, October 7th, 2014

At the September meeting of the Freeman School faculty, Dean Ira Solomon announced the recipients of five awards honoring professors for outstanding teaching, research and service.

The Dean’s Excellence in Teaching Award was established in 2012 to recognize faculty members who are outstanding instructors and whose teaching aligns with the strategic objectives of the school. The award – which is presented at both the graduate and undergraduate levels – is based on several criteria, including student evaluations, the level to which the faculty member integrates academic research into his or her teaching, and the extent to which the course provides high-impact experiential learning opportunities for students.

Parker125This year’s winner of the Dean’s Excellence in Teaching Award for Graduate Education is Geoffrey Parker. Parker, the Norman Mayer Professor of Business and professor of management science, joined the Freeman School in 1998 and was promoted to full professor in 2011. He is co-developer of the economic theory of two-sided networks, and his research explores the economics of and strategy of platform markets. In the classroom, Parker teaches Process Modeling and Technology Integration, Modeling and Analytics, and Platform Strategy, a course based in large part on his own research. He currently serves as research director of the Tulane Energy Institute and is a research fellow at the MIT Center for Digital Business and president of the Industry Studies Association.

HoangKrisThe Dean’s Excellence in Teaching Award for Undergraduate Education was presented to Kris Hoang. An assistant professor of accounting, Hoang joined the Freeman School in 2012 after earning her PhD from the University of Alberta. Her research focuses on judgment and decision-making in corporate governance and audit settings, and her teaching emphasizes the role of accounting information in management decision-making and strategy. The Dean’s Excellence in Teaching Award is Hoang’s third teaching award this year. In the spring, Hoang received both the FSG Teaching Award, presented by the Freeman Student Government Executive Board, and the BSM Howard W. Wissner Award, selected by a vote of the undergraduate student body.

Peter_Ricchiuti_125-2Established in 2012, the Dean’s Excellence in Intellectual Contribution Award was created to honor professors of practice and lecturers who have produced outstanding scholarly contributions. This year’s award went to Peter Ricchiuti. The William B. Burkenroad Jr. Professor of Practice in Finance, Ricchiuti began teaching at the Freeman School in 1986 and has served the school in variety of roles, including assistant dean and director of the Career Management Center. In 1993, he founded Burkenroad Reports, a student equities research program that has earned national accolades and helped place hundreds of students in finance positions. In 2014, Ricchiuti published his first book, Stocks Under Rocks: How To Uncover Overlooked, Profitable Market Opportunities (FT Press), an investing guide based on lessons he’s learned over the years as director of Burkenroad Reports.

Dean Solomon also announced a new award at the meeting. The Dean’s Award for Faculty Excellence was established to honor faculty members for outstanding overall performance. The award, presented each year at the discretion of the dean, recognizes professors who have exhibited sustained, exceptional performance in teaching, research and service. The inaugural recipients of the award are Michael Burke and Sheri Tice.

BurkeMichaelBurke, the Lawrence Martin Chair in Business and professor of management, joined the Freeman School in 1991 and holds an adjunct appointment in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences in Tulane’s School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine. One of the nation’s leading experts on worker safety training, Burke’s research focuses on learning and the efficacy of workplace safety and health interventions as well as the meaning of employee perceptions of work environment characteristics (psychological and organizational climate) and statistical procedures for assessing inter-rater agreement. Burke has chaired 34 dissertation committees and served as a member on an additional 51 committees at the Freeman School, the School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, and the Department of Psychology. He also recently completed a term as chair of Tulane University’s Social Behavioral Institutional Review Board as is now serving as  Management Area Coordinator at the Freeman School.

Sheri-Tice-_125Tice, the A. B. Freeman Chair of Business and professor of finance, joined the Freeman School in 1998 and was promoted to full professor in 2010. Her research focuses on corporate finance and the effect of firm characteristics on the decisions and performance of firms and their competitors. In the classroom, Tice supervises and teaches the Darwin Fenner Student Managed Fund course, an honors seminar in which students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels read current scholarly research on value investing and manage three portfolios totaling over $3.8 million in Freeman School endowment funds. Tice also serves as faculty director of the Master of Finance program and recently concluded a term as Finance Area Coordinator.

“One of the joys of serving as dean is the ability to recognize excellence in one’s colleagues, and these five faculty members clearly deserve recognition,” said Dean Solomon. “I would be remiss, however, if I failed to note that selecting these individuals was anything but easy because excellence resides broadly within the Freeman School faculty.”

 


New book shares the lessons of Burkenroad Reports

Tuesday, January 14th, 2014

As director of the Freeman School’s Burkenroad Reports program, Peter Ricchiuti has spent more than 20 years highlighting the small, profitable companies that often fly under the radar of Wall Street. Now, Ricchiuti has collected some of the lessons he’s learned over the years in a new book.

stocksunderrocks

Stocks Under Rocks shares some of the lessons of the Freeman School’s Burkenroad Reports program.

Stocks Under Rocks: How to Uncover Overlooked, Profitable Market Opportunities (FT Press), co-written with New Orleans Advocate features editor Annette Sisco, is a funny, informative guide to investing based on Riccchiuti’s experiences running the acclaimed student equities research program.

“It’s all the stories I tell in class and all the stories we get from visiting with the companies, but integrated into the funny stories is what we found that makes those companies a smart investment,” says Ricchiuti, a professor of practice in finance. “Every company represents a few anecdotes and a few funny stories but also one investment lesson learned.”

For example, don’t limit your investments to hip, sexy stocks. Ricchiuti says hopelessly unfashionable companies like pawn shops and convenience stores may not win you many points at cocktail parties, but they often generate higher returns than the latest media darling tech company.

“It’s the least attractive stuff,” Ricchiuti laughs, “but when you look at the financials, they all have great stories.”

Investors willing to look beyond the surface would learn that Cash America, for example, the pawn shop company, actually derives much of its revenue from a lucrative online loan business, while Susser Holdings, operator of Stripes convenience stores, attracts customers with a chain of high-quality in-store Mexican restaurants.

Ricchiuti says the biggest lesson of all when it comes to regional small-cap stocks is that individual investors really can gain an advantage over Wall Street.

“The conventional wisdom, particularly in academia, is that every stock is already efficiently priced, but when you get down low enough and small enough, there’s often times no other coverage,” Ricchiuti says. “If you’re willing to do the research, you really can know more than anyone else, and for an investor, that’s a great place to be.”

Peter Ricchiuti will be reading from and signing Stocks Under Rocks at the uptown location of Maple Street Book Shop on Thursday, Feb. 6, at 6 p.m.

 


Barron’s spotlights Burkenroad Reports

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

The Freeman School’s Burkenroad Reports program earned a national spotlight this week with a high-profile feature in Barron’s magazine.

Burkenroad-Reports

Barron’s praised Burkenroad Reports for the impressive record of its student analysts.

In Schooling Wall Street in the Big Easy, Barron’s reporter Christopher C. Williams profiles the long-running equities research program and highlights the impressive record of its student analysts.

Williams interviewed Peter Ricchiuti, professor of practice and founder of the program, for the article along with student analyst Jimmy Dunn (MBA ’14) and David Lundgren, manager of the Hancock Horizon Burkenroad Small Cap Fund, a mutual fund inspired by the program and which uses the reports as a primary source of research.

“Ricchiuti and his students zero in on what they consider value stocks, typically trading with a price-to-earnings growth ratio of less than one,” Williams writes. “Their targets tend to be little-known outfits in the energy or industrial fields, with market value below $1 billion, but they can pack a wallop in terms of stock performance.”

As an example of that performance, Williams cites appliance and furniture retailer Conn’s. Since earning a market outperform rating from students two years, the company’s stock has gained more than 600 percent.

“Schooling Wall Street in the Big Easy” appeared in the Oct. 7, 2013, print edition of Barron’s and is also available online at Barrons.com (subscription required).


Consumer confidence abounds at Burkenroad Reports Conference

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2012

This year’s Burkenroad Reports Investment Conference attracted a record attendance, and according to conference organizer Peter Ricchiuti, that’s a good sign for the economy.

Peter Ricchiuti

Peter Ricchiuti, right, says the best-performing Burkenroad Reports stocks this year were tied to consumer products and consumer confidence. (Photo by Stephen Daigle)

“I think investors are starting to get a little bit of their mojo back, and that really showed up in terms of how many people came,” says Ricchiuti, professor of practice and research director of Burkenroad Reports. “The other reason is people are really sick of getting 0 percent on their CDs and money markets. I think that was a driving force, too.”

The conference, which took place on Friday (April 27) at the Westin New Orleans Canal Place, is an annual showcase for the small- and mid-cap companies covered by the Freeman School’s Burkenroad Reports equities research program, but it also serves as a barometer of sorts for the economy, and judging by this year’s results, consumer confidence is back with a vengeance. Of the 40 companies followed by the program’s student analysts, the best performers this year were all consumer-oriented firms.

Leading the pack was Conn’s Inc., a Texas-based electronics retailer, whose stock boasted a total return of 229 percent in the last 12 months. Conn’s was followed by Susser Holdings Corp., an operator of convenience stores in Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Louisiana, which returned 98 percent, and Pool Corp., a wholesale distributor of pool and pool-related products, which returned 56 percent.

Perhaps an even bigger story at the conference this year was the disaster in natural gas prices. A boom in production coupled with an unusually warm winter has had a devastating effect on prices, and that drop has hit some Burkenroad companies hard. RPC Inc., an oilfield services company that does a lot of work with natural gas projects, has seen its share price fall from $18 to $9 in the last year.

The short-term picture may look bleak, but Ricchiuti says the long-term outlook for natural gas—an abundant domestic source of clean-burning fuel—remains bright.

“Sometimes, the stocks that are least loved turn out the best,” Ricchiuti says. “Last year at this time, everybody was worried if consumers would come back, and consumer stocks led the way this year. Now everybody’s fearing that natural gas will be swallowed up alive, so this is probably the time to be buying those stocks.”

This year’s conference attracted more than 700 attendees hailing from 18 states and three foreign countries, and in keeping with tradition, Ricchiuti says that number was almost equally divided between pinstriped professionals and so-called retail investors, the amateurs and hobbyists who attend the conference each year to help them better manage their IRAs and 401(k)s.

“We had some big-name professional people from some big firms, but you still had the housewives from Marrero, ” Ricchiuti laughs. “That was fun too.”


NPR: U.S. Has A Natural Gas Problem: Too Much Of It

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

From NPR’s Morning Edition, April 17, 2012:

NPR’s John Ydstie spoke with Peter Ricchiuti, professor of practice and research director of Burkenroad Reports, about the the boom in natural gas production.

Peter Ricchiuti, a professor at Tulane University in New Orleans and an expert on oil and gas production, says the normal supply-and-demand laws of economics aren’t working as they used to in the industry.

“Historically, this has always been kind of a self-governing mechanism,” Ricchiuti says. “When natural gas prices got too low, you’d start to see the industry lay down rigs until prices went back up again, and it was very effective. It was sometimes jokingly referred to as the ‘Redneck OPEC.’ ”

To listen to the entire segment, visit NPR.org:

http://www.npr.org/2012/04/17/150766635/u-s-has-a-natural-gas-problem-too-much-of-it

 


Burkenroad mutual fund celebrates 10-year anniversary

Sunday, March 11th, 2012

The mutual fund based in part on the Freeman School’s Burkenroad Reports investment research program recently celebrated its 10-year anniversary with a pair of prestigious honors.

Peter Ricchiuti

Peter Ricchiuti says the performance of the Hancock Horizon Burkenroad Small Cap Fund has been phenomenal.

Morningstar awarded the Hancock Horizon Burkenroad Small Cap Fund a coveted five-star overall rating, and Lipper ranked the fund as the second-best performer out of 303 funds in the small-cap core category over the last 10 years.

“It’s just a phenomenal story,” says Peter Ricchiuti, professor of practice and director of research for Burkenroad Reports. “I had high hopes for the fund, but its performance has exceeded my expectations.”

Inspired by the “stocks under rocks” philosophy of Burkenroad Reports, Hancock Bank launched the Burkenroad Fund in December 2001 to target companies located in the South with market capitalizations of less than $2 billion, a category that often flies under the radar of Wall Street. Befitting its name, fund managers use Burkenroad Reports as a significant source of research and invest in many of the companies followed by the program’s student analysts.

From less than $1 million in assets at launch, the fund has grown to more than $90 million. Even more impressively, it’s generated a return of 10.59 percent since inception, almost double that of the benchmark Russell 2000 index.

“The fund has outperformed about 99 percent of all equity mutual funds in its lifetime, and if you break it down to one-year, three-year and five-year numbers, the fund beat the benchmarks in those years too,” Ricchiuti says. “That’s unusual because you’re usually going to have times where some sectors or investment styles do better than others. To beat the S&P 500 and Russell 2000 in every period over 10 years is kind of amazing.”

To date, nearly 600 graduates of the Burkenroad Reports program have gone on to careers in the investment field. Ricchiuti says the success of the mutual fund gives students seeking to follow in those footsteps another valuable talking point for job interviews.

“The students not only have Burkenroad Reports to show prospective employers, but now they have the fund to talk about as well,” Ricchiuti says. “To be able to say your recommendations are going into a $90 million five-star mutual fund is a pretty impressive thing.”

 

 


WSJ.com: Big Worries for Small Caps

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

From wsj.com, May 2, 2011:

With so much hand-wringing going on, MarketBeat dropped a line to Peter Ricchiuti, a professor at Tulane University’s A.B. Freeman School of Business who has been tracking and trading small-cap companies for the past two decades. Are even some of small-cap’s biggest long-term boosters starting to get a bit hot under the collar? Uh, yes.

“I don’t know if it can continue,” Ricchiuti says, ticking off a list of worries. “The gap between pricing on large- and small-caps is, historically, very high. Another negative is that small caps tend to outperform large caps in the early stages of a recovery, and we’re starting to get some traction in the economy. That doesn’t bode well either.”

To read the entire article, visit http://blogs.wsj.com:

http://blogs.wsj.com/marketbeat/2011/05/02/big-worries-for-small-caps/


Burkenroad conference attracts biggest crowd in history

Monday, April 18th, 2011

It might not be obvious from the standing-room-only crowds, but investment professionals still regard the Burkenroad Reports Investment Conference, which took place on April 15 at the downtown Sheraton, as one of the industry’s best-kept secrets.

Peter Ricchiuti

Peter Ricchiuti, center, with James Harp, left, and Todd Hornbeck of Hornbeck Offshore Services, says this year's conference attracted more retail investors than in recent years.

“It’s not as visited yet by a lot of institutional investors or analysts, so you have the opportunity to get a lot of face time with the company executives,” says Richard Tullis (MBA ’97), senior analyst, energy exploration and production, with Capital One Southcoast. “You’re not really in competition with a ton of other investors, so you have a little bit of an advantage.”

For 15 years, the conference has served a showcase for the regional small- and mid-cap companies followed by Burkenroad Reports, the Freeman School’s acclaimed equities research program, but unlike most investor events, the Burkenroad conference caters equally to investment professionals and retail investors, the individuals who use information gathered at the conference to make decisions about their personal portfolios and retirement accounts. Nearly 600 people attended this year’s conference, making it the biggest in the event’s history, and conference organizer Peter Ricchiuti attributes much of that increase to renewed interest among retail investors.

“We got many more retail investors this year,” says Ricchiuti, research director of Burkenroad Reports. “The stock market has doubled in the last two years and they’ve been reluctant to get in. It seems like they’re finally ready to stick a toe in the water.”

Ricchiuti says some of companies drawing the biggest crowds this year were Cyberonics, Evolution Petroleum, Rollins and Iberia Bank, which has emerged as a major player in Florida by purchasing the assets of banks closed by the FDIC.

“The feds close them on Friday and want a vinyl banner in front on Monday and it can’t say ‘U.S. Government,’” Ricchiuti says. “I guess Iberia is just quick on their feet and knows somebody in the sign business, because they get all the good ones.”

To see photos from the conference, visit the Freeman School’s Flickr page at www.flickr.com/freemanschool.


A NYSE start for Freeman Days New York

Tuesday, September 28th, 2010
Burkenroad Analysts at NYSE

From left to right, Alexandra Thurber, Mark Popovich, David Cusimano, Max Joseph, Daniel Crowley, Anthony Elia, Dennis Grosche, Peter Ricchiuti, Ioana Martian and Jacque Noel.

The always enthusiastic Peter Ricchiuti, clinical professor of finance and research director of the Burkenroad Reports program, led a group of Burkenroad Reports analysts and investment research managers on a tour of the New York Stock Exchange during Freeman Days New York, which took place Sept. 16-17 at locations around New York.

This year’s Freeman Days was the biggest in the event’s history, with 28 companies, more than 150 students and nearly 150 alumni taking part in various sessions. Among the companies interviewing students, hosting site visits or delivering information sessions were Bergdorf Goodman, CBS, Bloomberg, Raymond James, BNP Paribas, Ernst & Young, Morgan Stanley, Google, Deutsche Bank, Macy’s, Citi, UBS, NFL, JP Morgan Investment Banking, Goldman Sachs and World Wrestling Entertainment.

Freeman Days New York was the first of four Freeman Days events sponsored by the Career Management Center this year. Freeman Days Houston will take place Sept. 30-Oct. 1 at the Marriott Hotel West Loop; Freeman Days Washington D.C. will take place on Oct. 29 at the Washington Marriott at Metro Center; and Freeman Days New Orleans will take place Feb. 10-11 at the Freeman School.

If you’re an employer or an alumnus and you’re interested in participating, visit FreemanDays.com for more information.



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