Posts Tagged ‘Geoff Parker’

MarketWatch: What Twitter knows that Blackberry didn’t

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

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From MarketWatch, Oct. 10, 2013

In the wake of Twitter’s recent IPO filing, Professor of Management Science Geoffrey Parker co-authored a commentary for MarketWatch on the growing impact of platform firms, companies with networked ecosystems that connect multiple players and provide tools for those participants to contribute and interact.

Ultimately, this transformation redefines competition. Firms that once sought advantage based on the strength of their internal resources and channel access now face competitors that harness armies of connected users and ecosystems of resources. Apple’s App Store, hosting nearly a million applications, offers a compelling testimony to the power of ecosystems.

To read the article in its entirety, visit MarketWatch:

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/what-twitter-knows-that-blackberry-didnt-2013-10-10


Research Notes: Prof. Geoffrey Parker

Tuesday, May 7th, 2013

Geoffrey Parker’s research is featured in the May 2013 issue of International Innovation, a publication dedicated to the dissemination of science and technology research. The article, titled The Power of Platforms, discusses the research conducted by Parker and Marshall Van Alstyne, associate professor at Boston University, on platform-driven markets, a topic the two colleagues have studied for over 15 years. The magazine also features a Q&A with Parker and Van Alstyne. Parker is a professor of management science at Tulane University’s A. B. Freeman School of Business.

 


Research Notes: Prof. Geoffrey Parker

Saturday, December 22nd, 2012

Geoff ParkerGeoffrey Parker’s paper “Integration and Cospecialization of Emerging Complementary Technologies by Startups” has been accepted for publication in Production and Operations Management. The paper, co-authored with Edward G. Anderson Jr., associate professor of Information, Risk, and Operations Management at the University of Texas at Austin, analyzes the market entry problem faced by startups that must integrate their service or product with one or more complementary technologies. The authors seek to extend the entrepreneurship literature by modeling startups’ entry decisions for markets in which complementary technologies exhibit strong learning effects. Parker is a professor of management science at Tulane University’s A. B. Freeman School of Business.

 


Energy summit aims to spur mutidisciplinary research

Tuesday, March 16th, 2010

Since 2008, the Freeman School and the School of Science & Engineering have been collaborating on research into the production and utilization of next generation fuels for clean power, including butanol from sugar cane waste products, but according to Geoff Parker, more research is needed.

Geoff Parker, director of the Tulane Energy Institute, hopes the inaugural Tulane Energy Day will help promote collaboration among researchers.

“A lot of times when we apply for grants or funding, we have some pieces of the puzzle, but we might have to scramble to identify all capabilities we need,” says Parker, associate professor of economic sciences and director of the Tulane Energy Institute. “Many of the challenges are really multidisciplinary now and require coordination across units.”

Promoting coordination across units is the goal of this Friday’s Tulane Energy Day. Sponsored by the Provost’s Office and organized by Parker and Doug Meffert, deputy director of the Center for Bioenvironmental Research, the one-day summit represents the first attempt to bring together researchers interested in energy from across the university. Faculty members from chemical and biomedical engineering, economics, business, environmental studies, public health, law and other disciplines will make brief presentations about their current research.

“This is one way to prepare to take advantage of some of the multidisciplinary opportunities that have been coming up as part of the stimulus funding,” Parker says. “It’s really about knowing what Tulane’s capabilities are.”

Much of Tulane’s recent energy research has been coordinated through the Clean Power and Energy Research Consortium, a collaboration between Tulane and five other universities in Louisiana established to addresses critical scientific, engineering and economic issues associated with power and energy generation. Given the complexity of the subject, Parker says a multidisciplinary approach makes sense.

“There are economic issues, there are scientific issues, there are cultural issues,” Parker says. “In order to make progress, you really need a multidisciplinary approach to understand the problems and then help fashion improvements.”

For more information about Tulane Energy Day and to see the complete schedule, visit http://www.freeman.tulane.edu/energy/energyday.php.



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