Archive for the ‘Freeman in the News’ Category

New Orleans Magazine: Family Legacies

Thursday, October 2nd, 2014

NewOrleansMagazine 150

Ira Solomon,  dean and Debra and Rick Rees Professor of Business, was interviewed for the October issue of New Orleans Magazine on the challenge of sustaining a family business over multiple generations.

Think it’s easy to keep a family business alive and well? Think again, says Dean Ira Solomon of Tulane’s A. B. Freeman School of Business. Only 40 percent of family-owned businesses in this country make it into the second generation, he says. And it gets more difficult as time goes by; just 13 percent make it into a third generation and a miniscule 3 percent are still family-owned by the fourth generation or beyond.

To read the article in its entirety, visit MyNewOrleans.com:

http://www.myneworleans.com/New-Orleans-Magazine/October-2014/Family-Legacies/


Freeman ranked fifth in nation for studying business abroad

Wednesday, July 16th, 2014

tulane

Business Research Guide, a website dedicated to technologies, products and services, and career and education options, has ranked the Freeman School No. 5 in the nation on its list of 30 Great U.S. Colleges for Studying Business Abroad.

With over 10 affiliate universities worldwide, students may choose to attend programs at the Leipzig School of Management, the University of Innsbruck in Austria, or Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Through a joint venture with the National Taiwan University and schools in Mexico and Europe, Executive MBA students may travel abroad to study global business practices, history, and culture. Graduate students may pursue internships during the summer at multinational corporations in Asia, Latin America, and Europe.

The ranking was based on commitment to excellence in international business education, variety of study abroad options for full and part-time students, and focus on global exchange with educational institutions across the globe.

The Freeman School began offering study abroad options for students in 1988. Since then, study abroad has become a major component of the Freeman School’s international program, which encompasses student and faculty exchanges, study abroad opportunities, initiatives like Burkenroad Reports for Latin America and the Latin American Research Consortium, and joint venture degree programs with 35 partner institutions in 20 countries.

To see the list in its entirety, visit Business Research Guide.

 


CFO Magazine: Nothing If Not Critical

Thursday, July 10th, 2014

cfo

Ira Solomon, dean and Debra and Rick Rees Professor of Business, is quoted in the current issue of CFO Magazine on a proposal to require auditors to disclose “critical audit matters” in their reports. The article explains the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board’s rationale for the plan as well as reasons why many CFOs and audit firms are uncomfortable with it.

What are we signaling to the users of financial statements when the auditor has to say, ‘Well, I reached that conclusion, but boy, it was really tough’?” asks Solomon. “Does it tell you that you ought to be more uncertain about that? What is it that you want me to think about when I consider loaning money to the company or investing in it?

To read the article in its entirety, visit CFO.com:

http://ww2.cfo.com/auditing/2014/07/nothing-critical/

 


CityBusiness: Tulane energy research calls for downstream focus

Tuesday, March 25th, 2014

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From New Orleans CityBusiness, March 25, 2014:

The report, authored by Tulane Energy Institute president Eric Smith and sponsored by Chevron, posits that relying on one technology, industry or energy feedstock such as natural gas is economically risky. Therefore the creation of “downstream value added opportunities” will be the key to extending the energy and manufacturing boom beyond the immediate commodity conversion stage.

To read the article in its entirety, visit NewOrleansCityBusiness.com.

http://neworleanscitybusiness.com/blog/2014/03/25/tulane-energy-research-calls-for-downstream-focus/


CFO.com: PCAOB’s ‘Audit Failure’ Rate Is Highly Suspect

Wednesday, March 5th, 2014

cfo

Ira Solomon, dean and Debra and Rick Rees Professor of Business, recently co-authored an opinion piece for CFO.com criticizing the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (PCAOB) for misleading statements regarding the quality of public company audits.

Solomon and co-author Mark Peecher, professor of accountancy at the College of Business at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, take issue with the PCAOB for its use of the term “audit failure” — which has traditionally referred to the joint occurrence of an unqualified audit opinion and materially misleading financial statements — to describe audits in which the auditor simply failed to obtain sufficient appropriate evidence to support its opinion on the financial statements, regardless of the fairness of the financial statements in question. The authors go on to say that PCAOB criticisms of auditors’ evidential bases are themselves open to criticism.

One reason is that PCAOB inspections usually occur after fieldwork, so hindsight bias can surface, especially when inspectors try to assess audit work on management’s estimates, which often are predicated on future economic events. That is, inspectors form retrospective judgments about auditors’ judgments regarding the reasonableness of management’s judgments. The management judgments in question concern things like the reasonableness of complex financial-statement estimates or the sufficiency of internal controls. It is hard to manufacture precision at the end of this judgment chain when it starts with so much ambiguity and uncertainty.

To read the article in its entirety, visit CFO.com:

http://ww2.cfo.com/auditing/2014/02/pcaobs-audit-failure-rate-highly-suspect/

 


Times-Picayune: Bitcoin digital currency is starting to appear in New Orleans small businesses

Thursday, January 16th, 2014

Times-Picayune

From The Times-Picayune | NOLA.com, Jan. 15, 2014:

Geoffrey Smith, visiting assistant professor of finance at Tulane University, described Bitcoin as an “alternate means of storing value” that investors are using as a hedge against the dollar. He said it needs more stability, but he thinks it has potential to catch on, particularly because of its inflation-fighting finite supply.

The system is expected to create 21 million Bitcoins and then stop issuing more. The coins often are traded as fractional units. The web sites bitcoinexchangerate.org and bitcoincharts.com reported Wednesday morning that one Bitcoin translated to about $830.

“People can use anything as currency,” Smith said. “In jail, people use cigarettes.”

“There’s nothing special about paper with green ink,” and nothing wrong with competing currencies, he argued. “It’s based on faith that it has value.”

To read the article in its entirety, visit NOLA.com.

http://www.nola.com/business/index.ssf/2014/01/bitcoin_digital_currency_is_st.html


WSJ.com: When Superstition Works

Tuesday, November 26th, 2013

WSJ_Logo

From WSJ.com, Nov. 25, 2013:

And while such superstitions can be broken, says Dr. Johar, it often takes a lot of negative evidence before people are willing to part with their lucky rituals. That’s because they “provide some sort of a hedge against uncertainty,” says Eric Hamerman, an assistant professor of marketing at Tulane University’s Freeman School of Business who, with Dr. Johar, co-wrote the study, published in October in the Journal of Consumer Research.

To read the article in its entirety, visit WSJ.com.

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303559504579197920998454920


HBR.org: Saving Academic Medicine from Obsolescence

Monday, November 11th, 2013

Harvard Business Review

From HBR.org, Nov. 8, 2013:

Ralph Maurer, professor of practice and interim executive director of the Levy-Rosenblum Institute for Entrepreneurship, co-authored an article for the HBR Blog Network about how Tulane School of Medicine is embracing disruptive innovation to deal with some of the challenges currently facing academic medicine. The article was written in collaboration with Benjamin P. Sachs, senior vice president and dean emeritus of Tulane School of Medicine, Marc J. Kahn, senior associate dean of Tulane School of Medicine, and Steven A. Wartman, president and CEO of the Association of Academic Health Centers.

One solution to this problem is moving the majority of primary and secondary healthcare delivery into the community. After Hurricane Katrina, Tulane partnered with a network of Federally Qualified Health Centers in order to provide services to low and middle-income patients in community-based clinics designated as medical homes. These not only provide less expensive care, but also provide the kind of experiential learning necessary to teach expertise to trainees.

To read the article in its entirety, visit HBR.org.

http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/11/saving-academic-medicine-from-obsolescence/

 

 


MarketWatch: What Twitter knows that Blackberry didn’t

Thursday, October 10th, 2013

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From MarketWatch, Oct. 10, 2013

In the wake of Twitter’s recent IPO filing, Professor of Management Science Geoffrey Parker co-authored a commentary for MarketWatch on the growing impact of platform firms, companies with networked ecosystems that connect multiple players and provide tools for those participants to contribute and interact.

Ultimately, this transformation redefines competition. Firms that once sought advantage based on the strength of their internal resources and channel access now face competitors that harness armies of connected users and ecosystems of resources. Apple’s App Store, hosting nearly a million applications, offers a compelling testimony to the power of ecosystems.

To read the article in its entirety, visit MarketWatch:

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/what-twitter-knows-that-blackberry-didnt-2013-10-10


Bankrate: Survey: Many Still Ask, ‘What is Obamacare?’

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

bankrate

From Bankrate, Sept. 11, 2013

Bankrate’s Jay MacDonald spoke to Assistant Professor of Marketing Janet Schwartz, an expert on the consumer experience of health care, for her reaction to a new survey on Obamacare.

Schwartz believes some of the bewilderment with the health care law stems from America’s employer-based health care system, which allows most people to avoid understanding the basics of health insurance.

“Purchasing health care turns out to be one of our biggest expenses, and yet it is very intangible,” Schwartz says. “If you purchase homeowners or car or life insurance, you know exactly what you’re getting, but with health insurance, it’s not clear. For most people, their employer plan has provided this huge buffer.”

To read the article in its entirety, visit Bankrate.com.

http://www.bankrate.com/finance/insurance/health-insurance-poll-0913.aspx

 



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